GD News

  • Bridging the Chasm: Why science and technology must become priorities for diplomacy and international policy – Part II S&T matters in international relations I see five primary reasons favouring a wholesale course correction and significant re-profiling of international policy priorities and resources. For purposes of brevity they will be set out at a high level of analysis: Science, technology and innovation drive the volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous age of globalization, and are now ...
  • Bridging the Chasm Science and Diplomacy If disaster is to be averted, it won’t be by increasing defence spending. Instead, diplomacy and international policy must better incorporate science and technology. Link
  • Bridging the Chasm: Why science and technology must become priorities for diplomacy and international policy – Part I Blogger’s note: The following article represents a partial reconstruction of remarks delivered at the second AAAS/TWAS short course on science diplomacy in Trieste, Italy on June 8th, 2015. For purposes of illustration, that address featured several rather elaborate stories. One spoke of Albert Einstein highlighting the distinction between timeless questions and evolving answers while invigilating ...
  • Canada and the Asia Pacific: Unsteady interest and opportunities lost Embassy Once upon a time, Canada was active and engaged in the Asia Pacific. Then, we dropped the ball. Link
  • Canada and the Asia Pacific: Unsteady interest and opportunities lost It is now the received wisdom the dynamic centre of the global political economy is migrating from the North Atlantic to the Asia Pacific. Emblematic of this dramatic example of shifting power and influence is the likelihood of China’s economy surpassing that of both the US and the EU within the next decade or two. And ...
  • Prospects for peace in the internet age Sec Dev Foundation and Canadian International Council – CPAC video Introductory panel discussions on new media prospects in international relations at Ottawa’s first Diplohack Link  
  • Digital diplomacy: All sweetness and light? Blogger’s note: Since early April I have been on the road almost constantly – teaching at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna, visiting my son in Greece, speaking at a digital diplomacy conference in Yerevan, traveling in Armenia, Ngorno Karabakh and Georgia, participating in a “Diplohack ” session in Ottawa, and now winding up a science ...
  • Rebuilding Canada’s international capacity: Diplomatic reform in the age of globalization Canadian Government Executive Sure, things are bad, but what is to be done? Link
  • Rebuilding Canada’s international capacity: Diplomatic reform in the age of globalization – Part II Editor`s note: This article is the second part of a feature  co-authored with my CDFAI colleague and friend Colin Robertson. We served together in the Canadian foreign service for 30 years.   The new diplomatic dialectic The days of designated envoys speaking only with each other about the business of government have gone forever. Diplomats now have to ...
  • Rebuilding Canada’s international capacity: Diplomatic reform in the age of globalization – Part I Editor`s note: This article was co-authored with my CDFAI colleague and friend Colin Robertson. We served together in the Canadian foreign service for 30 years.   The world is an ever more complicated place and diplomacy, the world’s second oldest profession, matters more than ever before. But it is a different form of diplomacy – embracing the ...
  • Learning from experience? The case against Canadian military engagement in Iraq/Syria The government has announced that it will table a motion in Parliament to extend and expand the bombing, training and special operations mission in Iraq. Syria may now also be included. Joining this mission was unnecessary; continuing and expanding it will compound the costs. Canada need not participate in this campaign. Following are five reasons why the ...
  • Why Canada should disengage from the Iraq/Syria mission Toronto Star Joining the bombing, training and special operations mission in Iraq was unnecessary; continuing and expanding it will compound the costs Link
  • The future of diplomacy Université de Montréal Centre d’études et de recherches internationales Interview on the future of diplomacy and international relations Link  
  • The case for science for science diplomacy International Peace Institute Global Observatory Interview recorded at consultations in support of the Independent Commission on Multilateralism Link
  • High hopes for the Independent Commission on Multilateralism Embassy Can the world’s international institutions be reformed to better advance peace and prosperity? Enter the Independent Commission on Multilateralism. Link
  • A better way forward? High hopes for the Independent Commission on Multilateralism Last August I attended a conference in entitled 1814, 1914, 2014: Lessons from the Past, Visions for the Future, organized jointly by the International Peace Institute (IPI) and the Salzburg Global Seminar. Over the course of that event, and despite whatever else may have been learned about the nature and impact of industrial-scale violence, it ...
  • How we can do diplomacy better iPolitics If he addresses the diplomatic deficit, the lack of grand strategy and the troubled Canadian brand, newly appointed Foreign Minister Rob Nicholson could make a difference. Link
  • For Canada’s new Foreign Minister? A three point plan As the dust settles in the wake of John Baird’s abrupt departure from the Foreign Affairs portfolio, little has been ventured about his successor, former Defence Minister Rob Nicholson. Given the new minister’s long record in government, we might reliably anticipate a steady, if somewhat slow hand on the tiller at Fort Pearson, and the ...
  • Out of Afghanistan: Winners and losers after thirteen years of combat Globe and Mail NATO has little to celebrate as coalition members rush for the exits and ISAF is replaced by the residual Resolute Support Mission. Link  
  • Out of Afghanistan? Still counting the costs Thirteen years after the campaign began, NATO’s International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) formally ended combat operations in Afghanistan on 28 December. A residual foreign military presence of about 18,000 troops, the Resolute Support Mission, will stay on for counter-terrorism purposes and provide training and logistical assistance to Afghan police and security forces. With rising Afghan civilian ...
  • Canada faltered on the world stage in 2014 Toronto Star As the year ends, Canadians receive a lump of coal for their country’s place in the world. Link
  • Cuba libre: What the Havana deal means to diplomacy iPolitics The US-Cuba rapprochement carries implications well beyond domestic politics and bilateral relations. Link  
  • US – Cuba rapprochement: The implications behind the headlines Reporting on the historic resumption of diplomatic ties between the USA and Cuba has tended to focus on the details of the agreement and the likely impact on domestic politics and bilateral relations. Beyond the spectacle of longstanding political and ideological adversaries coming to terms after a hiatus of over fifty years, there are a ...
  • Canada and the world today: Cold comfort, little joy As Christmas approaches and 2014 winds down, a survey of major political and economic developments suggests that the prospects for a more peaceful and prosperous world are receding. Thanks to the emergence of the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, the much-maligned Global War on Terror (GWOT), which only a year ago seemed to be waning, ...
  • Science Diplomacy: New Day or False Dawn? World Scientific Read the introduction to a comprehensive new anthology covering key issues in science diplomacy. Link
  • A time of remembrance, and forgetting Embassy This November, Canadians have special cause to remember, but much has also been forgotten. Link
  • A time of remembrance… and of forgetting For those with an interest in foreign policy, military history, and geopolitics, this month has been rich. Canadians marked a pair of significant commemorations – November 9th, the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, and November 11th, Remembrance (or Armistice) Day, which in 2014 fell during 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World ...
  • There’s a lot more to security than guns and surveillance iPolitics A five point strategy for Canada to counter the Islamic State and domestic political violence Link
  • Countering domestic political violence and the Islamic State: Canada needs a strategy In the wake of last week’s disturbing events in Saint-Jean-sur-Richileau and Ottawa, Canadian policy and decision-makers are turning their attention to remedial action. So far, rather than a rigorous re-assessment and course correction, indications are that we are headed for more of the same, but possibly worse. By way of alternatives, what would constitute an effective ...
  • Pin stripes and pearls? Ten (uneasy) steps to increased diplomatic capacity   In my last posting, I made the case for radical diplomatic reform as an alternative to the use of armed force in international relations. How would that work? A bit of background. Last month I attended an international conference in Salzburg which marked the centenary of World War One. It was entitled Architects or Sleepwalkers: 1814, 1914, ...
  • Ten steps to a world-beating diplomatic corps iPolitics Refined manners, book learning and Ivy League education still have a place in diplomacy, but so do the qualities of resilience and self-sufficiency more easily acquired through grassroots volunteer work and independent world travel. Link
  • For the West, war isn’t working anymore iPolitics Much of the present global instability — not least the devastating blowback now emanating from Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya — is rooted in the failure of previous military interventions. Link
  • A better way forward in a troubled world? Why radical diplomatic reform is imperative It is September, the seasons are changing, and Canadians have every reason to feel uneasy. The erstwhile global village is today looking more and more like a patchwork of gated communities surrounded by a roiling wasteland of violent and terrifying shantytowns. Over the course of the summer – and  undoubtedly much to the delight of Abu Bakr ...
  • Science and the limits of gunpoint diplomacy iPolitics The worsening “blowback” from Western interventions in Libya, Iraq and Afghanistan is cause for concern, but the bigger picture is even more disturbing. Link 
  • Blowback, Libya: More unintended consequences, less progress on the larger issues When it comes to Western attempts at armed intervention, the record of recent years – in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya – speaks convincingly for itself. Unprecedented gains by the Islamic State (IS) in Iraq have drawn the U.S. military back into the fray and have been accompanied by horrendous civilian carnage. The country is politically fractured and ...
  • Canada, NATO and the new Cold War CPAC video Panel discussion at  CDFAI conference 23 June 2014 featuring Ferry de Kerckhove, Robert Fowler, Daryl Copeland and George Macdonald. Link
  • One hundred years on, the Great War still has lessons for Canada Embassy If we are to more successfully broach the 21st century’s complex suite of threats and challenges, there is very much to be done. Link
  • One Hundred Years On, Reflections on the Great War: Memory, Meaning and a World in the Making – Part II On the surface, much has changed since the beginning of “the war that ended peace”. Today, various social media, the most contemporary expression of the continuing revolution in information and communications technologies, have become a popular pre-occupation. Twitter-expedited rebellions and a string of sensational WikiLeaks and state surveillance revelations have changed the game and served as ...
  • One Hundred Years On, Reflections on the Great War: Memory, Meaning and a World in the Making – Part I In this great future, you can’t forget your past. Bob Marley Today marks the 100th anniversary of the assassination in Sarajevo of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, by Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip. The Archduke’s  death set off a chain of events which in the space of a few months plunged much of Europe ...
  • Blowback: Iraq and the law of unintended consequences iPolitics The fallout from the disastrous US-led  invasion and occupation continues, and the ironies are striking. Link  
  • Iraq, Blowback and Lessons Unlearned: Reaping the Whirlwind Under relentless pressure from the jihadist movement Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), the political collapse and territorial disintegration of Iraq in recent weeks has been striking. If not reversed, the emergence of a radical Islamist enclave is likely to cause serious security problems for decades, both in the Middle East and beyond. That has ...
  • Negotiate with terrorists? CIC Rapid Response Relative to the international policy alternatives,  as a point of departure genuine dialogue is vastly preferable. Link
  • Diplomacy in a Digital Age 2014 Vienna Seminar, May 13-14 International Peace Institute President Terje Rød-Larsen chaired a panel discussion with Daryl Copeland, Dunja Mijatovic, OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, and James Rubin, Visiting Scholar at the Rothermere American Institute. Includes session videos. Link
  • Is Ukraine a crisis, or a dangerous distraction? iPolitics Amidst fears of widening conflict and a new Cold War, at the level of world order these events seem more about continuity than change, and that will be costly Link
  • Cold War redux? The high price of old habits – Part II Re-awakening of the ursine chess master As Russia has brought to bear its hard power assets in and around Ukraine – conventional military machinations combined with special forces deployment – policy and decision-makers in NATO countries have responded by ramping up sanctions and sending in reinforcements to the Baltic states, Poland and Romania.  It is not ...
  • Cold War redux? The high price of old habits – Part I I have spent the past 10 days in Austria, delivering a short course on science, technology, diplomacy and international policy at the  Diplomatic Academy of Vienna. Unsurprisingly, the rapid pace of developments in the immediate neighbourhood – Kyiv and points east – has produced a particularly strong sense of unease in central Europe. Much of the commentary ...
  • Out of Afghanistan Yesterday the Canadian flag was lowered in Afgnainstan for the last time, signalling the highly ambiguous termination of a long and ill-starred mission. Given the huge human and financial costs incurred over the past 12 years, Canadian politicians, opinion leaders and senior officials should have a lot of explaining to do. By any reasonable measure, those responsible ...
  • Can Obama move off ‘permanent war footing’? Embassy It will be a very tall order for  Obama to deliver on the sweeping foreign policy commitments contained in his State of the Union address Link
  • Blood spilled, treasure wasted: Can Obama move America off its “permanent war footing”? For those concerned with the future of  international relations, global issues, and Canadian foreign policy, President Obama’s January 28th State of the Union address contained some critical new commitments. The President pledged to avoid “open-ended conflicts”, to “give diplomacy a chance to succeed” and to put an end to the United States’ “permanent war footing”. But can ...
  • Thailand on the Brink iPolitics Just beneath the surface, there are troubles aplenty in the Land of Smiles Link
  • Thailand on the Brink: Appearance and Reality in the Land of Smiles In response to the rising violence which has attended the Bangkok Shutdown  movement, on January 21st  the beleaguered Thai government imposed a state of emergency. Armed with sweeping new powers, for the next 60 days state security agencies may impose curfews, detain suspects without charge, censor media, ban political gatherings of more than five people ...
  • Five ways the Snowden affair has disrupted world politics Globe and Mail Thanks to Ed Snowden, 2013 was a “Napster Year” for government secrecy and world order. Link
  • The Snowden Affair: 2013 as a “Napster Year” for Government Secrecy and World Order   When historians look back at the first few decades of the 21st century, 2013 will almost certainly be seen as a game-changing year. That judgement can in the main be attributed to a series of disclosures made by American fugitive Ed Snowden, formerly a low level CIA employee and National Security Agency sub-contractor whose flight and ...
  • Faced With a Changing World, Diplomacy Needs to Evolve The Jakarta Globe From the largest country in Southeast Asia, some welcome interest in the prospects for radical diplomatic reform. Link  
  • Pushing peacekeeping off the table iPolitics The demise of the Pearson Centre, and with it Canada’s commitment to international peacekeeping, has left us all poorer. Link
  • Pearson’s ghost: The short road from peacekeeping training to the promotion of religious freedom We need action not only to end the fighting but to make the peace… Lester B. Pearson, November 2, 1956 This inscription on Canada’s national peacekeeping memorial, and indeed the monument itself have now taken on new meaning. Earlier this month the Pearson Centre, a Canadian institution devoted to the promotion of peace, security, human rights and ...
  • The Syria effect: How the world has returned to diplomacy Globe and Mail Among those who prefer dialogue, negotiation and compromise to the use of force in international relations, the last few weeks have been both exceptional and instructive. Link
  • At long last, is diplomacy finally on the rebound? Among those prefer dialogue, negotiation and compromise to the use of force in international relations, the last few weeks have been both exceptional and instructive. For more than a decade – in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya – major powers have reached first for the gun. Defence, rather than diplomacy or development, has been the international policy ...
  • Update Syria: Is the War on Terror finally over? iPolitics Can diplomacy, democracy and multilateralism for once trump the use of force in international  relations? There are guarded gronds for hope. Link  
  • Diplomacy, democracy and multilateralism: On the 12th anniversary of 9/11, is the crisis in Syria bringing the world to its senses? Whatever else might be said about the age of globalization, one of its defining qualities is the speed with which circumstances can change. The last few days have been particularly head-spinning. Just over a week ago, in response to allegations of chemical weapons use by the Assad regime, some kind of armed Western intervention in Syria seemed ...
  • Western military intervention in Syria? Bad idea, but… It seems to be happening. Again. In Washington, the drums of war are beating more loudly with each passing day, and if the breathless media commentary is to be believed, the die has already been cast. Yet little or nothing will be gained from Western military intervention in Syria at this juncture, while the downside risks associated with ...
  • Feature interview with Daryl Copeland on Radio Canada International Does Canadian diplomacy still matter? What might be done to restore its relevance and effectiveness in the age of globalization and heteropolarity? Listen here.
  • In Defence of Diplomacy CIC In a heteropolitan world order, talking trumps fighting. Link
  • Canadian diplomacy must adapt Radio Canada International  In an extended interview, Daryl Copeland  discusses how diplomacy can best address the challenges of the globalization age. Link
  • In defence of diplomacy: Canada must do better Embassy Canada’s “diplomatic ecosystem”‘ is on life support. That’s not good enough. We can, and must take action. Link
  • Globalization and Heteropolarity: Canada’s Diplomatic Ecosystem must Adapt The world is beset by a host of daunting, seemingly intractable problems, ranging from climate change and environmental collapse to diminishing biodiversity and pandemic disease.  These profound threats, unlike political violence or religious extremism, afflict everyone on the planet. Many citizens, alarmed by the declining quality of their lives, have become cynical and dismayed as the ...
  • Diplomacy, Globalization and Heteropolarity: The Challenge of Adaptation CDFAI Policy Papers In Canada as elsewhere, the “diplomatic ecosystem” is on life support. How to fix diplomacy, the foreign ministry and foreign service? Link
  • Manning verdict leaves the big issues unresolved There is something for almost everyone in the judgement delivered yesterday against Bradley Manning, the army private who single-handedly conveyed hundreds of thousands of classified diplomatic documents and military battlefield reports to the so-called whistleblowing web site WikiLeaks. This is the largest unauthorized transfer of government-origin classified information ever recorded. Manning’s detractors – those who see him ...
  • After the Manning verdict, four big issues remain untouched Globe and Mail Critical matters of public policy lurk just behind the headlines in the sensational trial of whistleblower Bradley Manning. Link
  • The Snowden Affair: Winners and Losers Ed Snowden, the US citizen and cyber-surveillance whistleblower, has been somewhere in the transit area of Moscow’s labyrinthine Sheremetevo international airport for almost one month.  His disclosure of documents detailing mass telephone and internet monitoring by US, UK, NZ, Australian and French intelligence agencies, often with active private sector collusion, has resulted in him being ...
  • As Snowden lingers in Moscow Globe and Mail By illuminating the extent of state-sponsored cyber-spying directed at both domestic and foreign targets, Mr. Snowden’s disclosures have both produced winners and losers and set the stage for possible remedial action. Link
  • The vanishing Canadian iPolitics What has become of Canada’s once-admired  international brand ? Link
  • Where in the World is Canada? Amidst breaking news of convulsions shaking Egypt, Turkey and Brazil, the election of a moderate president in Iran, the despatch of a UN “intervention force” to the DRC, and revelations of massive cyber-surveillance, Canadians are understandably distracted.  Few seem to be paying much attention to an issue of longer-term, yet potentially much larger domestic consequence ...
  • Canada: The view from afar Editor’s note Over the past six months I have had occasion to spend much of my time working and travelling overseas. I spent the first few months of the year teaching a course on science, technology, diplomacy and international policy at Otago University in Dunedin, New Zealand, and last month I participated in several conferences  in ...
  • Afghanistan and Pakistan:Looking back, looking forward CDFAI Media Brief The outcome of the election in Pakistan is unlikely to enhance the prospects for peace in Afghanistan. Link
  • Afghanistan: Looking Back, Looking Forward There has been much commentary and speculation in recent weeks regarding Pakistan’s national elections, and the possible impact of the results upon events in Afghanistan. While the nature of developments in Pakistan might well amount to the single most important external influence, not least because of the shared Pashtun population on either side of the ...
  • Pakistan Won’t Save Afghanistan Will elections this weekend in Pakistan improve the prospects for peace and develoipment in Afghanistan? OPENCANADA.ORG Link
  • Pin Stripes on the Picket Lines? Why the Plight of Canadian Diplomats Matters – Part II The rub The Government of Canada should be doing everything in its power to support its employees on the foreign policy front lines. Alas, for diplomats this is not the case. Years of underinvestment, exacerbated by over $300 million in cumulative cuts imposed on DFAIT by the 2012 federal budget, have severely degraded the work environment. Add ...
  • Pin Stripes on the Picket Lines? Why the Plight of Canadian Diplomats Matters – Part I Last month the membership of the Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers  (PAFSO), Canada’s working-level diplomats, voted overwhelmingly in favour of job action. The 1350 members of this occupational group, who have been without a contract since June 2011, are now in a legal strike position. While this situation has raised eyebrows, to date the actions ...
  • Why don’t diplomats get the respect they’ve earned? iPoltics What is the contract dispute between the Government and Canada’s Foreign Service really all about? Link
  • Boston marathon bombings OPENCANADA.ORG How best to respond to terrorist violence? Link
  • The CIDA – DFAIT Merger OPENCANADA.ORG Rapid Response comment Link
  • Diplomats ratchet up job action Embassy Foreign Service officers in legal strike position launch job action to underscore grievances Link
  • Digital Diplomacy: The Power of Attraction Digital Diplomacy: The Power of Attraction The fifth episode of our web series (4 minute segment featuring Daryl Copeland)
  • What Ails Diplomacy? Follow the Money Part four of the Guerrilla Diplomacy web series – a brief comment by Daryl Copeland. (If you would like to view previous short webisodes in the series, please scroll down.) 3 minutes, Ecotone Productions (Produced by Chris Lowry)
  • Science Diplomacy: Back To The Future Part three of the Guerrilla Diplomacy web series – a brief comment by Daryl Copeland. 3 minutes, Ecotone Productions (Chris Lowry)
  • Thirty Years On: Reflections on DFAIT and the Diplomatic Prospect – Part IV Editors’s Note: Abridged versions of the following retrospective have appeared recently in bout de papier (in print) and on the web site of the Canadian International Council.  The final instalment of the full, unedited text follows. Turning the page Too bleak?  Perhaps we can all look forward to reading a comprehensive rejoinder refuting the arguments set out ...
  • Wicked Transnational Issues: Think Outside the Diplomatic Box Part two of the Guerrilla Diplomacy web series – a brief comment by Daryl Copeland. 3 1/2 minutes, Ecotone Productions (Chris Lowry)
  • Thirty Years On: Reflections on DFAIT and the Diplomatic Prospect – Part III Editors’s Note: Abridged versions of the following retrospective have appeared recently in bout de papier (in print) and on the web site of the Canadian International Council.  The third instalment of the full, unedited text follows. Continuous learning? At a personal level, what kernels of wisdom might I have acquired during the passage? For starters: a diplomat’s most ...
  • Thirty Years On: Reflections on DFAIT and the Diplomatic Prospect – Part II Editors’s Note: Abridged versions of the following retrospective have appeared recently in bout de papier (in print) and on the web site of the Canadian International Council.  The second instalment of the full, unedited text follows. Greasing the skids… DFAIT’s network of missions abroad should provide the foundation for the foreign ministry’s comparative advantage vis-à-vis other ...
  • Why Diplomacy Matters More Than Ever Canadian International Council What did I learn over the course of 30 years in the Canadian Foreign Service? Link
  • Thirty Years On: Reflections on DFAIT and the Diplomatic Prospect – Part I Editors’s Note: Abridged versions of the following retrospective appear today in bout de papier (in print) and on the web site of the Canadian International Council.  The first instalment of the full, unedited text follows. A burning platform London cabbies are a great source of received wisdom. Over the past several years I have had occasion to ...
  • What is diplomacy? Why Does it fail? How can it be more effective? Here is part one of a new web series from Ecotone featuring Daryl Copeland.
  • We can’t do effective diplomacy from a bunker iPolitics Getting beyond “the bubble”  requires more than social media skills and may involve risk, but that comes with the territory. Link
  • Diplomatic Security: A Necessarily Elusive Goal? A few weeks ago I was asked by a journalist to comment on the role of military police guards at Canadian diplomatic missions. As I had never worked in an embassy or consulate under those circumstances, I was unable to be of much help. Still, the query got me thinking about the matter of diplomatic security ...
  • Harper’s underwhelming ‘secret’ foreign policy plan iPolitics No sign of grand strategy in the government’s uninspired  global blueprint. Link
  • Coming up short: No sign of a grand strategy in Canada’s “secret” foreign policy plan The leak of a draft Canadian foreign policy plan, first reported nationally on 19 November, was treated breathlessly by the media and hyped as a major story. By way of contrast, the event has generated something of a yawn from members of the commentariat. Insofar as that lacklustre response reflects what we know of the apparently insipid ...
  • Canada needs to remember Afghanistan Globe and Mail With Remembrance Day approaching, Canadians should reflect on their country’s role in this continuing conflict. Link
  • Canada in Afghanistan: The Need to Remember, and Lessons Unlearned Editor’s note: A version of this article appears in today’s Globe and Mail. Remembrance Day is approaching. Despite some 160 dead, several thousand wounded, and perhaps tens of thousands afflicted with continuing  psychological disorders, the extent to which Canada’s long and costly engagement in Afghanistan has faded from the public mind is striking. Major questions, ranging from the ...
  • Could a virtual community help save the planet? iPolitics Using new media to bridge the performance gap in international science and technology. Link
  • Could a Virtual Community Help Save the Planet? Using New Media to Bridge the Performance Gap in International Science and Technology It is hardly news that the world is beset by a bewildering array of complex and difficult challenges, ranging from how best to manage the global commons, to diminishing biodiversity, to resource scarcity. Most of these pressing issues have a major scientific and technological (S&T) component, both in terms of generating the problems and in ...
  • Tools for a more resilient public diplomacy (guest post) Editor’s note: As a treat for readers of the GD blog, it is a pleasure to present this guest post by colleague and friend Ali Fisher. It approximates a presentation he made via videoconference to my MA class on “Science, Technology, Diplomacy and International Policy” at Ottawa University on October 10. Towards for a ...
  • Canada in Afghanistan: Assessing the Costs iPolitics After over a decade at war, what has been achieved? Link
  • Canada in Afghanistan: Assessing the Costs Last weekend, as I participated in a conference entitled Armed Intervention: Lessons from Afghanistan, the US reported its 2000th military death in that long-running conflict. Although the exact circumstances remain rather murky, the killing was apparently the result of an Afghan recruit turning upon his ISAF trainers. Like so much else about the Afghan conflict, NATO’s ...
  • Diplomacy After Benghazi Canadian International Council The sacking of the U.S. consulate in Benghazi raises a host of vexing questions. Link
  • In the Wake of Benghazi: Thoughts on Diplomacy, Security and Representation The sacking of the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, the tragic deaths of U.S. ambassador Chris Stevens and three of his staff, and the continuing protests outside U.S. embassies throughout the Greater Middle East raise a host of vexing questions. Unfortunately, when it comes to striking an appropriate balance between the competing demands of effective diplomatic representation ...
  • Science, diplomacy and the great disconnect iPolitics Could Canada re-establish its international credentials through science diplomacy? Maybe. Link
  • Science, Diplomacy and the Great Disconnect: An Opportunity for Canada? Back in mid-June, I wrote a retrospective piece entitled “Rebranding Canada: From the Siege of Sarajevo to Rio Plus 20”. In that essay I tried to highlight the extent to which Canadian foreign policy has been transformed over the past several decades, and argued that although gradual and in large part unnoticed, the reorientation has ...
  • WikiLeaks’ Long, Strange Tail ìPolitics What to make of the trials of Julian Assange and the latest developments in the WikiLeaks saga? Link
  • WikiLeaks’ Long, Strange Tail Irony and paradox, as elements of art, add texture, depth and complexity. The same is true in life, and perhaps nowhere more so than in the ever-surprising case of Julian Assange, the founder of Wikileaks and for many a champion of the freedom of information, a resister of arbitrary authority and a defender of the public ...
  • Rethinking Canada’s foreign ministry iPolitics Could a Department of International Affairs and Global Issues be smaller and more beautiful than DFAIT? Link
  • Rethinking Canada’s Foreign Ministry: Could Smaller be More Beautiful? Much of my time during 30 years at DFAIT – in addition to performing many and varied day jobs – was spent doing whatever I could to encourage reform. Trying to change the system from within did not result in 20 years of boredom – far from it. And that protracted struggle may even have ...
  • Exploring the myths of international relations: three deadly disconnects? iPolitics Examining the conventional wisdom  which underpins world order. Link
  • Exploring the Myths of International Relations: Three Deadly Disconnects? Summer in Canada is a wonderful time to reflect. In that spirit, I was intrigued by an article, entitled “Seven Myths About International Relations”, which appeared recently on the splash page of the Canadian International Council’s (CIC) web site. It is part of a new series being published under the theme Diplomacy and Duplicity: The Myths, ...
  • In defense of DFAIT iPolitics Diminished diplomatic capacity damages Canadian interests Link
  • In Defense of DFAIT: Why Diminished Diplomatic Capacity Damages Canadian Interests These are not the best of days at DFAIT. According to an article on p.1 of this week’s of Embassy magazine, Canada will be moving to a “hub and spoke” model for its diplomatic network in Europe, centralizing resources at a few larger missions while reducing the Canadian presence elsewhere in the region. A box on p. ...
  • Re-branding Canada: From the Siege of Sarajevo to Rio Plus 20 iPolitics From global Boy Scout to moralizing warrior nation – what a long, strange trip it’s been. Link
  • Re-Branding Canada: From the Siege of Sarajevo to Rio Plus 20 This spring marks the 20th anniversary of two international events of signal importance in the history of Canadian international policy – the start of the 44 month siege of Sarajevo (April 06) and the UN’s Rio Conference on Environment and Development, or Earth Summit (June 03-14). I was reflecting on the significance of this pair of ...
  • Public Diplomacy and Branding, Part IV: Some Practical Implications USC CPD Blog In PD practice, who does what – when, how, and why? Link
  • Public Diplomacy and Branding, Part IV: Some Practical Implications In the previous three entries in this series I have tried to compare and contrast various aspects of PD and branding – two related, but nonetheless distinct approaches to the management of a country’s international relations through public engagement, image projection and reputation management. In the last installment (Part III), I undertook to comment upon ...
  • Public Diplomacy and Branding, Part III: A Pair of Aces? USC/CPD Blog If branding is about selling dreams, public diplomacy is about sharing them. Link
  • Public Diplomacy and Branding, Part III: A Pair of Aces? In a couple of recent postings I have tried to elaborate the notion of a nation brand, to identify some of the salient issues surrounding the relationship between public diplomacy and branding, and to illuminate the more subtle distinctions. In this entry, I would like to drill down further into each of ...
  • Public Diplomacy, Branding and the Image of Nations, Part II: More of the Same, or Different? USC/CPD Blog PD and nation branding share many superficial attributes, but drilling down reveals that the differences outweigh the similarities. Link
  • Public Diplomacy, Branding and the Image of Nations, Part II: More of the Same, or Different? One of the defining attributes of being in a centre of global commerce and culture is the feeling you get when walking down the sidewalks. In London, I found the experience of strolling a few blocks from where I was staying to the downtown campus of UEA London, in large part along the fabled Brick Lane, ...
  • Ottawa-Gatineau on the world stage Canadian Geographic What the Capital Region needs to enhance diplomacy. Link
  • Diplomacy still matters – but new training needed Embassy If provided with resources and training, diplomats can and should be restored as catalysts for imaginative strategic thinking. Link
  • Rethinking Diplomacy, Security and Commerce in the Age of Heteropolarity A few weeks ago I attended  an International Symposium on the the subject themes organized by the University of East Anglia’s London Academy of Diplomacy.  I was especially keen to participate because I had helped with the conceptualization and design of the conference.  Lately I have also been trying to develop the idea of heteropolarity ...
  • GD at the Diplomatic Press Attaches Club in London Embassy Magazine (UK) Link
  • CBC cuts gut cherished international service Montreal Gazette Link
  • A Diminished Canada The Mark CBC’s announcement that it is withdrawing from foreign-language broadcasting in two of the four BRIC countries is just another nail in the coffin for Canadian internationalism. Link
  • The Incredible Shrinking Canada… Just Keeps Getting Smaller Over the past few days  there has been some commentary in the mainstream and electronic media about the hard reality of this country`s ever diminishing place in the world. Still, such observations have not produced the  groundswell resistance that they warrant among Canadians. For reasons which I have tried to assess earlier, this is not entirely surprising. Moreover, ...
  • A diminished Canada at home and abroad Ottawa Citizen Link
  • The Incredible Shrinking Canada The Mark Last week’s budget spells disaster for what little remains of Canadian internationalism. Link
  • The Incredible Shrinking Canada I am now approaching the end of my sojourn in London, some comments about which were referenced here.  While away I have even managed to get a bit of Canadian press. After almost a month away, I must say that in relation to the relative absence of similar possibilities in Ottawa, there is lots of ...
  • Observers regret shelving of annual foreign diplomats forum canada.com Another indication of DFAIT’s demise Link
  • Public diplomacy, Branding and the Image of Nations – Part I USC/CPD Blog What’s in a brand? Link
  • Public Diplomacy, Branding and the Image of Nations, Part I:What’s in a Brand? I am writing today from London. Although I will be going in to see colleagues at the FCO next week, I confess that I have not been thinking much about whether or not the Brits will be able to top, or at least equal the Chinese in skillfully using the occasion of the Summer Olympics to ...
  • Connecting the Dots The Mark The search for meaning in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya … and Syria Link
  • Connecting the Dots: The Search for Meaning in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, and Syria Iraq. What a stark reminder of how short the road is between heresy and received wisdom. Even in the mainstream press, today the majority view is that the intervention in Iraq was a barely veiled disaster. In excess of 100,000 civilian casualties, 4486 American soldiers dead, 32, 226 wounded, and over a trillion dollars spent. The statistics are ...
  • Heteropolarity, globalization and the new threat set Embassy In the heteropolar world under construction, security will flow not from defence, but from development and diplomacy. And the diplomatic centre of gravity will shift away from formal chancelleries and into storefronts, souks, and conflict zones. Link
  • Heteropolarity, Globalization and the New Threat Set In the last two posts I have tried to develop the concept and content of heteropolarity, which I  believe has some value as a heuristic tool for describing and analyzing contemporary world order. In part three of the trilogy, I assess the implications for grand strategy and the work of foreign ministries. The most profound threats ...
  • Heteropolis rising: World order in the 21st century Embassy With the emergence of distinctive poles, international power and influence have become more difficult to align Link
  • Heteropolis Rising: World Order in the 21st Century In the previous post,  I argued that the short-lived era of unipolar American hegemony has given way to  a new international dispensation best characterized as heteropolar rather than multipolar. This metamorphosis may be attributed mainly to a series of colossal strategic misjudgements and the profusion of diverse sources of power and influence globally. ...
  • Heteropolarity, security and diplomacy Embassy Since the end of US unipolar dominance, most commentators have suggested that we are reverting to a multipolar world order, as was the case prior to the Cold War. This time around, however, the sources of international power and influence among and between various poles will be much more difficult to align. Link
  • Heteropolarity, Security and Diplomacy: Not the Same Old, Same Old Almost a decade ago, at an annnual conference of the International Studies Association, I heard my colleague James Der Derian from Brown University use the word heterpolar to describe the new world order. I had not come across the term before, and was uncertain as to its precise meaning. Still,  it struck me at the ...
  • A Future for Canadian Public Diplomacy? The Mark With memories of Canadian leadership on global issues receding, the generation of renewed commitment will be an uphill battle. Link
  • Canadian Public Diplomacy, Then and Now The Mark Canada was once a pioneer in public diplomacy, but today that legacy has been left behind. Link
  • A New Diplomacy for the EU? New Europe Can the EU speak as one in addressing the issues which imperil the planet? Link
  • Canadian Public Diplomacy – Where to? In the previous post, I tried to show that during the 1980s and ‘90s the paradigm for the delivery of Canadian international policy shifted fundamentally. Over the course of those years, there was a deliberate move away from an emphasis on traditional, state-to-state interaction in the direction of public diplomacy (PD). This form of international ...
  • Today, most Canadians don’t look far beyond their front door Ottawa Citizen Demographic shifts and changes in international news coverage have transformed the public environment in which international policy is formulated. Link
  • Canadian Public Diplomacy, Then and Now I have recently been reviewing a new book entitled Diplomacy in the Digital Age, which is a collection of essays prepared in honour of Allan Gotlieb, a former Undersecretary of State  for External Affairs and Canada’s ambassador in Washington from 1981-89. It is an absorbing anthology, and contains valuable entries penned in some instances by ...
  • A retreat from the world stage Ottawa Citizen Domestic politics and diminished bureaucratic capacity have down-sized Canada’s place in the world. Link
  • The Retreat From Internationalism – Part II In the last entry, I tried to illustrate how changes in domestic Canadian politics, in combination with the imposition of capacity reductions on the Department of Foreign Affairs, had contributed to a turn away from this country’s internationalist traditions. Today, I continue that line of inquiry with an exploration of the profound shifts in the ...
  • Science Diplomacy: What’s It All About? CIPS Policy Brief If science diplomacy is so important, why is it so obscure? Link
  • The Retreat From Internationalism – Part I From the late 1940s  through to early in this century, Canada enjoyed a reputation as a determined, capable and effective internationalist. Regardless of which party formed the government, this country actively engaged with other peoples and states in the in the pursuit of collaborative solutions to the world’s major problems and challenges. From the founding ...
  • No Time to Celebrate Victory in Libya The Mark With a litany of complex problems to address in the wake of Gadhafi’s ouster, NATO’s self-congratulation is premature. Link
  • Libya: Lingering Doubts From the outset of the Libyan episode, there have been ample grounds for reservation. Both the manner in which events have unfolded, and also the longer-term implications, are troubling. Objections to the lack of public debate, to NATO’s tendency to reach for the gun before exhausting all alternatives to the use of armed force, to ...
  • Diplomacy in the Digital Age The Mark While the means of diplomacy have changed, the ends have not. Link
  • Diplomacy in the Digital Age Today the contributors to a recently released collection of essays assembled under this title and edited by Janice Stein will gather in Toronto to discuss the lifetime contribution to the diplomatic profession of  former Ambassador to the USA Allan Gotlieb. It is encouraging to see attention of this nature being directed towards the study of diplomacy. ...
  • Diplomacy, Journalism and the New Media The Mark The immediacy, interactivity, and accessibility of new technologies have changed the rules of the game. Link
  • Diplomacy, Journalism, and the New Media Over the course of the past few months I have been conducting research for an article on “Digital Diplomacy” and the implications of the “WikiLeaks/Cablegate” revelations for diplomatic practice and international relations. That piece, when finished and peer reviewed, is scheduled to appear in a forthcoming reference text entitled the Oxford Handbook on Modern Diplomacy. Reflecting ...
  • Reimagining Diplomacy by Daryl Copeland Canadian Geographic – October 2011 Does Ottawa meet the five preconditions that define and often determine the nature of diplomacy and international politics in a given place? © Daryl Copeland and Canadian Geographic 2011 Link to article (PDF)
  • The Libya Question: Panel Discussion
  • True North in Transition: Canadian Foreign Policy Post-9/11 Embassy Canada’s international image and reputation – our brand – are being recast. Link
  • Canada and the world post-9/11: What has been learned? Looking back over decade since 9/11, what events and developments stand out globally? Among others: The ongoing Global War on Terror and associated Western military interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan. The hollowing out of the middle class, the financial crisis and the continuing Great Recession. The lost opportunities to support non-violent political reform during the Arab Spring. 9/11 changed ...
  • Questioning the Wisdom of Foreign Intervention The Mark Libya demonstrates that force continues to supplant diplomacy as a foundation for international policy. Link
  • Libya and the World after Gadhafi: Preliminary Thoughts It is perhaps premature to propose potential conclusions and lessons learned in the immediate wake of the rebel victory over the Gadhafi regime. On the surface, it appears that NATO support for the rebellion assisted materially in achieving the objective of ridding Libya of a widely detested dictator. In terms of success, this would seem to ...
  • Criticism Mounts Over Decision to Skip Expo ’12 Postmedia News Link
  • Mind the Infrastructure Gap Macleans.ca Link
  • Sitting on a Powder Keg The Mark Globalization has led to a problematic gap between haves and have nots. Link
  • Sitting on a Powder Keg One of the defining characteristics of globalization is its tendency to produce winners and losers by polarizing, economically, socially and politically, within and between nations. Globalization’s benefits have been privatized, while its costs have been socialized.  The appearance of severe inequalities – in incomes, opportunities, and future prospects ...
  • Yet Norway Responds with Grace The Mark The Norwegian reaction to last week’s terror attack says more than any expert analysis ever could. Link
  • Learning from Norway: A Measured Response to a National Tragedy The bombing of government buildings in central Oslo, and killings at the Labour party’s summer camp on the nearby island of Utoya, have shocked Norway and the world. Carefully planned and executed with devastating effect, apparently by 32-year-old Norwegian national Anders Behring Breivik, these acts were deeply troubling, and anything but arbitrary. One week ...
  • As Canada’s Cities Slowly Crumble The Mark How prioritizing military spending led to the neglect of our infrastructure. Link
  • Coming Home: Reality Check It is a pleasure to return to the exquisitely sweet softness of central Canada in mid-summer. While the month away in New Zealand and Australia for a series of speaking engagements, conferences and meetings with government, university and NGO representatives on matters of science, technology, diplomacy and international policy, was delightful, it’s always nice to be ...
  • An Excellent New Zealand Adventure The Mark How a trip to a foreign policy conference became a hands-on lesson in good foreign relations. Link
  • In Aotearoa: Small is Beautiful I have been back in New Zealand, the enchanted Land of the Long White Cloud, since June 16. During that surpassingly enjoyable period I have been  reacquainting myself with various parts of the country – Auckland, Northland and the Coromandel peninsula, attending a conference on Science Diplomacy at Otago University’s 46th Foreign Policy School in ...
  • Science Diplomacy in Southland, New Zealand Media coverage of the Foreign Policy School at Otago University, Dunedin. Link Link Link
  • Science Diplomacy: New Day or False Dawn The Mark The universal language of science offers hope for the future of international policy, but in the case of science diplomacy, global demand far exceeds supply Link
  • Science Diplomacy: New Day or False Dawn? A few weeks ago in Oslo, Norway, in the company of about 40 other invitees from around the world, I attended an OECD “experts” meeting, sponsored by the Norwegian and German Ministries of Education and Research, on the subject of Science, Technology, Innovation and Global Challenges. The workshop was predicated upon the shared realization that if  ...
  • Review of The Seven Paradoxes of Public Diplomacy, my chapter in a new book by Fisher and Lucas (eds.): The Trials of Engagement AmericanDiplomacy.org Link
  • The New Threat Set: Humanity’s Race Against Time From May 18-20th in Oslo, Norway, along with participants from some 40 countries and organizations around the world, I attended an “experts workshop” on Science, Technology and Innovation to Address Global Challenges. The meeting was organized jointly under OECD auspices by the Norwegian and German Ministries of Education and Research The agenda included presentations and discussions ...
  • The Real Threat Set: Humanity’s Race Against Time Huffington Post Canada Global challenges rooted in science and driven by technology trump the threat represented by religious extremism or political violence Link
  • What’s Next for Canada’s Armed Forces The Mark The nature of conflict is changing. Canada should have a debate about the direction of its military. Link
  • Defence Policy, International Security and the Military: Time to Talk South of the border, there have in recent years been a growing number of voices expressing serious concern over the militarization of American life. I certainly share that sentiment. Is an F-16 fly over and trooping the colours  really appropriate for the opening of the Super Bowl? The USA is apparently becoming the Praetorian pole in an increasingly  ...
  • After Osama: Time to Turn the Page? The Mark Bin Laden’s death presents an opportunity for the U.S. to move on from a troubled foreign policy. Link
  • Osama and Obama: Turning the Page? The reported killing earlier today of Osama Bin Laden by US special forces in Abbottabad, Pakistan, is unlikely to prove a game changer for American foreign policy. Secretary Clinton has already suggested as much – the war on terror will continue unabated. Careers, promotions, budgets and bonuses depend on it. I believe such a commitment to ...
  • Commercial Diplomacy: A New Frontier The Mark As global issues grow in importance, it’s time to get creative when promoting economic interests abroad. Link
  • The Bottom Line: Thoughts on Commercial and Economic Diplomacy For the past few weeks I have been lecturing and travelling in the UK and Europe with a group of MA candidates in diplomacy and international business. They are studying at the University of East Anglia’s London Academy of Diplomacy, and the subject of my short course is science, technology and international policy. Even by Canadian ...
  • Canada’s Role in Science Diplomacy: Applying Science to International Challenges CPSC 2010 Video and report from Canadian Science Policy Conference  Link
  • Days of Future Past – Part II Editor’s Note. A few days ago I received an email from one of my younger brothers. While cleaning out some old files, he came across a paper which I had sent along for comment back in the spring of 1993. It was entitled At the Crossroads and had been prepared for delivery ...
  • Days of Future Past – Part I Editor’s Note. A few days ago I received an email from one of my younger brothers. While cleaning out some old files, he came across a paper which I had sent along for comment back in the spring of 1993. It was entitled At the Crossroads and had been ...
  • Diplomacy was on the rebound in Montreal Embassy At this year`s annual conference of the  International Studies Association, a bumper harvest  for scholars and practitioners of the world`s second oldest profession. Link
  • The War That Started While No One Was Watching The Mark How did an unenthusiastic debate on a no-fly zone in Libya turn into an armed international conflict? Link
  • Five Potential Pitfalls of Western Military Intervention in Libya In a posting penned a couple of weeks ago, I expressed serious reservations  over the growing prospect of a Western military intervention in Libya. A political and diplomatic resolution would have been far preferable.  It remains a mystery in Western capitals how the unenthusiastic consideration of a no-fly-zone somehow morphed, with minimal public or political ...
  • Diplomacy on the Rebound at the Brain Food Buffet From Tuesday through Saturday last week I attended the 52nd annual conference of the International Studies Association (ISA) in Montreal. The theme for this year’s event was Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition. What does that mean? I still can’t say. But I can attest that this meeting represents one of the very rare occasions during ...
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy at the Clinton School of Public Service University of Arkansas Speaker Series Video Link
  • What’s Next for Libya The Mark There is a growing sense of dread as western military assets are deployed to the Eastern Mediterranean, and politicians are speaking increasingly of the possibility of some sort of intervention. Link
  • Arms and the Man: What’s Next for Libya? “Libya is engaged in a civil war. New protests have broken out in Oman, Bahrain and Yemen. The uprising in Tunisia, the pioneer state of the so-called “Arab Spring,” is entering a second phase. As usual, the amateurish Obama administration has no idea what to do about any of this. …America has established that its ...
  • Egypt after Mubarak: Talking About a Revolution? The Mark Mubarak’s departure from power is hardly inconsequential, but is it more symbolic than substantial? Link
  • WikiLeaks: Implications for Diplomacy, the Media and the Public Interest Munk School panel discussion with Daryl Copeland, Brian Stewart, Rafal Rohozinski and Robert Latham Video Link
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy at the Canadian Science Policy Conference PUBLICSCIENCE.Ca Audio Link CPSC 2010 Video Link
  • Egypt After Mubarak: Talking About A Revolution? The departure of President Hosni Mubarak from Cairo on 11 February, bound apparently for his villa at Sharm al-Sheikh on the Red Sea, unleashed a torrent of breathless media commentary about the “Egyptian Revolution”. It may be that change of a revolutionary magnitude is in store for Egypt, but to date the events in that ...
  • Cairo Burning: Implications for the Defence vs. Diplomacy Debate The following commentary, based in part on my “Ferment in North Africa” entry, was posted by the University of Southern California’s Public Diplomacy Blog 02 February: This is one of those rare, defining moments in world history. In Egypt – as well as Tunisia, Sudan, Yemen and elsewhere – change is unfolding at ...
  • Taking Stock of WikiLeaks and Cablegate: A “Napster Moment” for Government? USC PDiN Monitor Link
  • Stabilizing the Global Village with Guerrilla Diplomacy The Mark The current political crises in Egypt, Tunisia, and Sudan require grassroots solutions that balance negotiation, problem solving, and global political knowledge. Link
  • Cairo Burning USC CPD Blog What does the crisis in Egypt tell us about the defence versus  diplomacy debate? Link
  • Ferment in North Africa: A Guerrilla Diplomacy Take Stand-off in Tunis. Riots in Khartoum Cairo burning. In the erstwhile global village, which today looks more like an island patchwork of  heavily guarded, gated communities surrounded by an angry sea of seething shantytowns, the relentless forces of globalization continue to transform world politics. Cairo is the current, and increasingly turbulent epicentre, but many ...
  • Forces of Globalization: Looking Forward, Looking Back The Mark The Cold War may have ended long ago, but the job of the international relations analyst, the diplomat, and the soldier has only become more difficult. Link
  • Looking Forward, Looking Back: Cautionary Vignettes The outset of a new year, and indeed, of a new decade, is as good a time as any to pause and reflect.  As far as I can determine, the roiling, whirling forces of globalization which have been dominant for at least twenty years continue to cut all ways. Consider, for instance, this initial sampling: Long-serving Tunisian ...
  • WikiLeaks’ short-term damage, long-term gains Embassy A “Napster moment” for government, yet any chill  on diplomatic relations is likely to be fleeting, while the reputation of diplomacy stands to benefit. Link
  • WikiLeaks, Diplomacy and the Public Interest Looking back over the key developments affecting international relations during 2010, the continuing release of over 250,000 US-origin diplomatic communications stands out as especially significant. The story broke just over a month a month ago, and has been with us every day since. This must already amount to something of an endurance record  given the relentless ...
  • How Canada Could Contribute to Science Diplomacy The Mark Through the successful practice of science diplomacy, Canada could make a real difference in the world – but significant reform is needed first. Link
  • Role of the FCO in UK Government Written Submission to UK Parliamentary Inquiry Link
  • A Role for Science Diplomacy? Soft Power and Global Challenges – Part III Parts I and II of this series have examined the role and place – or lack thereof – of science and technology in diplomacy and international policy. How do those observations play out in reference to Canada, and, by extension, for members of the international community more generally? The Canadian case brings many of these issues, ...
  • Wikileaks: What you need to know Toronto Star Link
  • Science, Technology and Global Change The Mark Science and technology should be central to international diplomacy, but most foreign ministries and multilateral organizations are short on scientific expertise and technical savvy. Link
  • WikiLeaks Revelations: The Implications for Diplomacy e-International Relations Wikileaks is releasing hundreds of thousands of classified diplomatic communications. But when the dust settles and the sensational tid-bits are forgotten, some of the longer-term impacts on diplomacy may in fact be positive. Link
  • WikiLeaks Revelations: The Implications for Diplomacy N.B.: The post below was prepared as a guest editorial for e-International Relations. Some of the front end argumentation may be familiar to regular GD readers, but the topic is of sufficient currency that I have presented the piece in its entirety. In my book Guerrilla Diplomacy, I argue that if development is the new security ...
  • A Role for Science Diplomacy? Soft Power and Global Challenges – Part II Part I of this series examined the relationships – or lack thereof – between diplomacy, science and international policy, and noted the serious image problems which plague all three enterprises. These difficulties have hobbled the practice of science diplomacy, and are compounded by a host of substantial issues, which will be addressed presently. First, however, ...
  • A Place for Science Diplomacy? The Mark In the age of globalization, public diplomacy – not defence – should be front and centre in international relations, and science diplomacy is a critical component. Link
  • A Role for Science Diplomacy? Soft Power and Global Challenges – Part I Readers of Guerrilla Diplomacy will know that in that volume I argue that if development is the new security in the age of globalization, then diplomacy must displace defence at the centre of international policy. Were policy-makers to accept this formulation, then diplomacy, and in particular public diplomacy (PD), would be placed front and centre in ...
  • Diplomacy and War – Then and Now The Mark The history of war is that of  failed diplomacy. By reflecting on past conflicts, we might begin to see how to avoid future ones. Link
  • Daryl Copeland to Present at CIC North Bay Daryl Copeland will present on the subject of Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations at the Canadian International Council (CIC) in at Nipissing University, North Bay, Ontario on November 17, 2010. Download Event Poster (PDF) (as per image above)
  • War and Diplomacy – Part IV Two weeks after the shock of Canada’s UNSC debacle, discussions concerning the larger implications of that disaster continue. And so they should. Among the many possible messages, it is clearly time to turn the page on Pearsonian Internationalism and to get on with the job of rebranding this country as the globalization nation. Where else but ...
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy in D.C. Washington Forum Network (PBS-NPR) Can international relations be managed non-violently?
  • How the World Sees Canada The Mark Radio In light of Canada’s failed bid for the UN Security Council, is it time to rethink our foreign policy strategy? Link
  • Science Diplomacy CBC.ca Muzzling scientists impedes global problem-solving. Link
  • What Canada’s Security Council Loss Says About Us The Mark With the glory days of Pearson’s internationalist foreign policy behind us, Canada needs a new narrative Link
  • United Nations Security Council Elections and the Canadian Brand: The End of the Illusion? On October 12, 1957 the Nobel Committee announced that Lester Pearson would be awarded the Peace Prize for his role in addressing the Suez Crisis. Fifty-three years later to the day, Canada lost out to Portugal – a small, former colonial power –  in its bid for election to the United Nations Security Council. To my ...
  • The difference between war and diplomacy Embassy Could diplomacy have resolved outstanding differences and accommodated the rise of new powers by offering plausible alternatives to violence? Link (PDF)
  • War and Diplomacy – Part III In the past two posts, using the examples of Iraq and Afghanistan, I have tried to show that in today’s highly conflicted world,  diplomacy matters more than ever. That said, the world’s second oldest profession is underperforming and faces a crisis of relevance and effectiveness. Diplomatic institutions and practices have not adapted well to the ...
  • Afghanistan: Seven Steps Towards Peace The Mark There are no military solutions to Afghanistan’s complex problems of bad governance and severe underdevelopment. Link
  • War and Diplomacy – Part II: A Way Out of Afghanistan? Afghanistan is a crossroads of civilizations and an almost bewilderingly complicated place. Over the past few centuries, however, it has more often than not been treated as a pawn in the “great game”.  The country has also developed a reputation as the “graveyard of empires”, not least because outsiders’ forces have never succeeded in pacifying the ...
  • The Lesson of Iraq The Mark One hundred years after “the war to end all wars,” diplomacy remains in the margins of international policy. Will Iraq help us see our error? Link
  • War and Diplomacy – Part I The media has been littered over the past week with reports concerning the departure from Iraq of the last US combat troops. On the margins of that coverage, and to a greater extent in the think tank press, questions have been posed about the conduct of the war, its costs, what may have been achieved, ...
  • GD Selected as AFSA Book of the Month for August 2010 The American Foreign Service Association has chosen Guerrilla Diplomacy as its Book of the Month for August. PDF
  • How To Stop An Insurgency The Mark NATO has only one realistic counterinsurgency option for Afghanistan: negotiating a political settlement. Link
  • Listening to Lawrence – Part II By my reckoning, history suggests that at the end of the day there are only three ways to successfully counter an insurgency. The most obvious technique is that referred to rather disparagingly by T. E. Lawrence and set out in the previous post: suffocate the spark of resistance under the sheer weight of massive ...
  • Lawrence of Afghanistan The Mark NATO leaders could learn some useful lessons on counterinsurgency from T. E. Lawrence (of Arabia). Link
  • Listening to Lawrence – Part I Last Sunday, August 1st, the Dutch began a low key, unceremonious withdrawal from participation in the NATO/ISAF mission to Afghanistan. With 24 dead, 140 wounded, and over a billion euros expended, Holland is the first major member of the ISAF coalition to head for the exit. This event, however, was almost lost in the Canadian ...
  • A Better Way to Do International Policy The Mark Why do governments still rely on costly and counter-productive military solutions in addressing global problems? Link
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy Revisited It has now been a year since the release of Guerrilla Diplomacy. I have spent much of this time trying to promote the book’s main arguments in support of restoring the diplomatic ecosystem and de-militarizing international policy. Following are a few reflections on those efforts. In countless presentations in Canada, the USA, UK, Europe, Australia ...
  • Canadian Multilateralism: An Opportunity for Diplomatic Alternatives? Last month the Canadian International Council released its report, Open Canada, on possible new directions for Canadian foreign policy. There is much to commend about this easily-digested document, not least the fact that at a critical moment a group of thoughtful Canadians took the time and effort required to bring the ambitious project to completion ...
  • Globalization Nation The Mark Canada’s brand has less to do with the beauty of its nature than the nature of its people. Link
  • The World’s Oyster? Rethinking Canada as the Globalization Nation With the G8/G20 meetings about to begin, the attention of the international media will inevitably, if fleetingly, focus on Canada. What kind of impression might be conveyed? For journalists prepared to eschew the backdrops, sound bites and briefing books and to venture beyond the sterile secure areas, there may be a few surprises. Even the least intrepid ...
  • Waging Modern War The Mark Radio In the asymmetric conflicts which characterize the age of globalization, diplomats, not soldiers should be on the front lines (with Mercedes Stephenson, Barbara Falk and Donald Savoie). Link
  • From DFAIT to a Department of International Affairs? The Foreign Exchange Changing the name of the foreign ministry will be the easy part… Link
  • Making Sense of Intelligence The Mark When done well, diplomacy can help make intelligence gathering more intelligent. Link
  • Making Sense of Intelligence What’s in a name? In the lexicon of international relations, key terms such as  intelligence and diplomacy are often bandied about without much regard for their actual meaning. Diplomacy is a non-violent approach to the management of international relations which features a dedication to dialogue, negotiation and compromise. Since at least the time of Chamberlain in Munich, ...
  • Dark shadow over the Thai smile Globe and Mail In the era of globalization, underdevelopment breeds insecurity and shared identity no longer assures unity Link
  • Making Diplomacy a Counterinsurgency Weapon Embassy Can non-violent approaches to conflict resolution make a difference in addressing the complex challenges of counterinsurgency? Yes, but that contribution cannot be fully realized under present circumstances. Link
  • Political Officers in Conflict Zones: Public Diplomacy and Counterinsurgency – Part III The past few posts have focused on the potential role of diplomacy in addressing the complex challenges of counterinsurgency. Can non-violent approaches to conflict resolution make a difference? Yes, but it is unlikely that contribution cannot be fully realized under present circumstances. It is not just that the diplomatic business model has not responded adequately to the challenges ...
  • When Might is Not the Right Way The Mark The military can be used for peaceful purposes, but it isn’t designed for political and economic work. Link
  • Political Officers in Conflict Zones: Public Diplomacy and Counterinsurgency – Part II Development is a strategic and moral imperative…  our intention is to elevate development so that it stands alongside defense and diplomacy and an equal. Defense, development and diplomacy need to reinforce each other, but each also brings a unique perspective and set of capabilities to the table. Together, they make us stronger, smarter and more ...
  • Diplomats on the frontlines of counterinsurgency work Embassy As the erstwhile global village goes heteropolar, it is coming to resemble something akin to a patchwork of gated communities surrounded by seething seas of shantytowns. Link
  • Fighting With Diplomacy The Mark With irregular warfare now the norm, diplomats need to take the lead in resolving conflicts, not the military. Link
  • Political Officers in Conflict‭ ‬Zones:‭ ‬Public Diplomacy and Counterinsurgency – Part I‭ With the‭ ‬end‭ ‬of the great military confrontation in Central Europe,‭ ‬world wars are unlikely to recur.‭ ‬In the heteropolar world order which is arising, tensions will be generated and sparks will fly, but major powers will find non-violent ways to resolve their differences. They must, if the catastrophic consequences associated with the failure to accommodate ...
  • GD in OZ Daryl Copeland’s most recent podcast from the book tour:  Griffith Asia Institute/AIIA in Brisbane Link
  • Where Diplomacy Resonates The Mark In an increasingly heteropolar world, New Zealand and Australia are positioning themselves for the Pacific Century Link
  • Lessons from the Ends of the Earth In my recent travels down under, I was struck repeatedly by the sense in which New Zealand and Australia seem for a Canadian at once remote yet accessible, exotic yet familiar. They are in, but not of the Global South. I was even more impressed by the extent to which the necessity of adapting to the reality ...
  • What’s in a Nation’s Brand? The Mark The silver fern and the maple leaf  could do with more global exposure. Link
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Rethinking International Relations in a World of Insecurity e-International Relations (e-IR) is a hub of information and analysis on some of the key issues in international politics. Daryl Copeland says diplomacy can help make the world a better place
  • Rejuvenating the diplomats The Sydney Morning Herald, Australia Guerrilla Diplomat, Daryl Copeland, on the effective use of nation brands in a ‘heteropolar’ world The rising powers all have different kinds of power, China in manufacturing, India in intellectual services, Russia in energy resources, Europe in “soft” power. Middle powers like Canada and Australia have less relative clout, so must use ...
  • Diplomat blasts shift to policy by force The Canberra Times, Australia “Militaries work best when you don’t use them. That sword stays sharpest when you leave it in the scabbard. Take it out and it makes a terrible mess just look at Iraq and Afghanistan.” Link
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy at Lowy Institute for International Policy Daryl Copeland argues that diplomacy has been sidelined by globalisation and is facing a crisis of relevance and effectiveness. Listen to audio. Link
  • Canadian diplomat proposes new role for ‘guerilla diplomats’ ABC News Australia interviews author Daryl Copeland: “first of all… implicate diplomacy much more closely with development” Link
  • Daryl Copeland on Radio New Zealand National Guerrilla Diplomacy casts a line on NZ’s National radio Link
  • The Silver Fern, The Maple Leaf… What’s in a Nation’s Brand? Yesterday evening evening I was in Gore, a smallish town of about 10,000 way down near the bottom of the South Island of New Zealand, about one third of the way between Invercargill and Dunedin. The motor camp in which I stayed did not yet have internet service – most now do – but along the ...
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy in Aotearoa After a pause to regroup and to deliver a graduate seminar on Science, Technology and International Policy at the University of Toronto’s Munk Centre for International Studies, the GD road show is rolling on. First stop is the Land of the Long White Cloud, or Aotearoa, where I arrived 01 March. For those who have not had ...
  • Striped Pants Backpacker Foreign Policy Association Interview and commentary from the conference circuit. Link
  • Diplomacy Today: Lessons from the Raj? The Mark Sometimes looking backwards offers insights  into the future. Link
  • Memo to Europe: What’s Next? Foreign Policy In Focus Europe has an opportunity to act as one in an increasingly heteropolar world. Is it up to the challenge? Link
  • Diplomacy’s Prospects: Looking Forward, Looking Back – Part II After side trips to Haiti and Afghanistan in recent postings, I return now to the matter of inter-cultural political communications, and to the role of diplomacy as an alternative to the use of force. No matter how you cut it, the decision to intervene militarily in foreign lands is fraught, and past experience with escalation in ...
  • Hard Power Vs. Soft Power – Mixing Might with Diplomacy The Mark When it comes to Afghanistan, mixing military might with diplomatic talk is easier said than done. Link
  • Panel – Redefining the Diplomatic Mission: Implications for Theory and Practice Friday, February 19, 2010: International Studies Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA, February 17-20, 2010. FD55: Friday 3:45 PM ‐ 5:30 PM Panel – Redefining the Diplomatic Mission: Implications for Theory and Practice Sponsor(s): Diplomatic Studies Chair: Kathy R. Fitzpatrick, Quinnipiac University Disc.: Daryl Copeland, Foreign and International Affairs, Canada A European Foreign Service: Turning Diplomacy Inside‐Out Mai’a Keapuolani Davis Cross: University of ...
  • Roundtable – Guerrilla Diplomacy: Revolution in Diplomatic Affairs – International Studies Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA, Wednesday, February 17, 2010 Wednesday, February 17, 2010: International Studies Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA, February 17-20, 2010. WB53: Wednesday 10:30 AM ‐ 12:15 PM Roundtable – Guerrilla Diplomacy: Revolution in Diplomatic Affairs Sponsor(s): Diplomatic Studies Chair Nabil Ayad, University of Westminster Disc. Daryl Copeland, Foreign and International Affairs, Canada Participant Geoffrey Allen Pigman, Bennington College Participant Kathy R. Fitzpatrick, Quinnipiac University Participant Ali R. Fisher, Mappa ...
  • Daryl Copeland to Speak at MaRS Discovery District January 29, 2010: Daryl Copeland will be speaking at MaRS, at 2:00PM on the 29th of January at the offices of the McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health on the 4th floor.
  • Hard Power, Soft Power, and Talking to the Taliban In the wake of the London conference on Afghanistan last week, there has been much speculation about whether or not a page has been turned. Does the strategic balance now favour talking over fighting en route to the withdrawal of foreign troops? In order to understand, frame and contextualize recent developments, it may be useful to ...
  • Beyond Relief The Mark Haiti doesn’t just need immediate assistance, it also needs long-term, sustainable development. Link
  • Daryl Copeland and Evan Potter get set to duke it out February 4th over the future of diplomacy Thursday, February 4, 2010 Rendez vous Room Lester B. Pearson Building 125 Sussex Drive Ottawa, Ontario
  • A Future Without Force The Mark “The blunt instrument that is the military only gets us bogged down in wars without end.” Link Toronto Star
  • Earthquake in Haiti: Reflections in the Aftermath I will return to a consideration of diplomacy’s prospects in the 21st century in a future posting. In the meantime, it seems to me that the disaster in Haiti, and the response of the international community, merit some sustained reflection. In Haiti, do the ethos of guerrilla diplomacy and the imperative of providing emergency medical and humanitarian ...
  • Failure in Copenhagen The Mark “The multilateral meltdown at COP 15 was at best a learning experience, at worst a harbinger of future attempts at global governance.” Link Toronto Star
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy Panel Discussion with Daryl Copeland 1:00-2:30pm – Munk Centre for International Studies – Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies Join Daryl Copeland, author of Guerrilla Diplomacy and Senior Fellow at the Munk Centre and PCS students Lauren Alexiuk and Anila Akram for a discussion of what might be done to better equip diplomacy, the foreign ministry and the Foreign Service to meet the challenges of the 21st century. For anyone with a penchant for negotiation ...
  • Daryl Copeland, Guest Speaker – colloquium on Canada and its place in the world Daryl Copeland will be Guest Speaker at the weekly colloquium Canada and its place in the world — part of the bilingual Master program in Public and International Affairs (MPIA) at Glendon College, York University. The event will on Thursday, February 11, from 3.00 to 5.00 at Glendon Campus, 2275 Bayview (corner of Lawrence), Toronto.
  • Diplomacy’s Prospects: Looking Forward, Looking Back – Part I During my travels in the fall of 2009, and especially while spending time on trains and in airports, I  had many opportunities to reflect on the nature and future of diplomacy and international policy. I concluded that during the first decade of the 21st century, and 20 years after the end of the Cold War, ...
  • Coming up Short in Copenhagen: Puzzling a Multilateral Meltdown Today is Winter Solstice in Central Canada. From this point forward, and for the next six months, the days begin to get get longer. That is an encouraging thought. And a superior one when compared to anything that I can muster when reflecting on the meaning of the just-concluded Copenhagen conference on climate change. Some background. For ...
  • A Decade of Foreign Policy – The Road to 2010 Embassy: Canada’s Foreign Policy Weekly Copeland: “…we’re not moving into a mutlipolar world in the era of globalization, but a heteropolar world” Link
  • The Disappearing Foreign Ministry The Mark Canadian foreign policy is becoming more militarized, just when it should be becoming more diplomatic. Link
  • Canada and the World – II This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series Canada and the WorldIn recent years a spate of books and reports by Jennifer Welsh, Andrew Cohen, Canada 25, and many others have set out in some detail Canada’s recent international performance and perceptions thereof. To know where to go in international policy, you must know ...
  • Canada and the World – I This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Canada and the WorldIt has been a week now since I returned from Foreign Policy Camp in Vancouver – an amazing enterprise largely ignored by the mainstream media. What to make of the Camp? The event was superbly organized, innovatively delivered and very well attended by a ...
  • Daryl Copeland talks Guerrilla Diplomacy on CBC’s The Current Daryl Copeland was a guest on CBC’s The Current (Listen to Part Two) with Anna Maria Tremonti on Thursday, December 3rd. “long-time Canadian diplomat Daryl Copeland calls for a radical rethinking of how we conduct diplomacy, an idea he calls Guerrilla Diplomacy.”
  • Long-time Canadian diplomat Daryl Copeland calls for a radical rethinking of how we conduct diplomacy CBC’s The Current He spent nearly 30 years as a Canadian diplomat… Now, he has written a book that calls for a radical retooling of the trade. Audio Link
  • Foreign Policy Camp Photo: jhussain Daryl Copeland Attends Foreign Policy Camp in Vancouver, B.C. Official Site | Mashboard
  • It’s time to build a better diplomat The Globe and Mail The profession has to adapt to the imperatives of modern world-order management. Illustration: Anthony Jenkins/The Globe and Mail Link: It’s time to build a better diplomat
  • An International Power? The Mark Canada once had influence in international politics. In a hetero-polar world, it could again. Link to Article: An International Power?
  • Heteropolarity Under Construction: Reflections from the GD Road Show Looking out at dawn over the banks of the South Saskatchewan River from a hotel restaurant in Saskatoon,  the thin, reedy, late November light illuminates a grey-brown landscape impatient for the arrival of snow. That blanket will obscure the detritus of a season passed and reveal in its place the essential patterns and forms which lie ...
  • Daryl Copeland at RHOMA luncheon (Victoria, BC) – December 3, 2009 Mr. Copeland will speak at the Christmas luncheon of the Retired Heads of Mission Association (RHOMA) which takes place on December 3, 2009, at 12 noon at the Uplands Golf Club in Victoria, B.C.
  • Daryl Copeland at University of Victoria – December 2, 2009 Daryl Copeland will speak at 3:30 PM on 2 December in MacLauren D281 – University of Victoria. Under the sponsorship of the university branch of the Canadian International Council and Centre for Global Studies to present his book: Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations Daryl Copeland is an independent and critical thinker on Canadian foreign policy. He is on academic ...
  • PM’s high-stakes mission to Asia Toronto Star “…Daryl Copeland, a Canadian analyst, author and lecturer in international diplomacy, agrees: he also feels the re-emergence of Asia represents a unique opportunity for Canada.” Link to: PM’s high-stakes mission to Asia
  • Remembrance Day How Obama’s Nobel can resurrect diplomacy (PDF) An article by Daryl Copeland in Embassy Magazine
  • Twenty Years On in Berlin: One Europe in the Making? Last night at the Brandenburg Gate I attended the commemorative ceremony organized to mark the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall, the re-unification of Germany and Europe,  and the end of the Cold War. That is a lot to celebrate, but to call the event historic does not quite convey the emotion, the ...
  • Meet A Guerrilla Diplomat An interview with Daryl Copeland Interview Link
  • A Grand Strategy for Europe? In late September I posted a piece on the relationship between guerrilla diplomacy and grand strategy, which might be summarily defined as the achievement of broad agreement on comprehensive international policy objectives, and on how that, and they, might best be accomplished. I would like to pick up that thread, and examine in particular some of ...
  • Brussels Agenda: Guerrillas in the Midst “…diplomats must be empowered to manage globalization, but to do that successfully, diplomacy itself will have to be re-invented.” Link
  • Noam, Me and the Media Not too far back, I  promised to share with readers a short blast of vintage Chomsky which I received while researching Guerrilla Diplomacy. That posting will have to be perused in order to establish the context for the passage which follows. Fasten your intellectual safety belts: The suggestion you make is not consistent with the facts.  ...
  • CPD Fellows Discuss ‘Reinventing Diplomacy’ in October’s World Politics Review “Daryl Copeland addressed the reinvention of diplomacy and international relations…” Link to Review
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy: The Revolution in Diplomatic Affairs World Politics Review It’s time to bring the world’s second oldest profession into the 21st century. Link
  • The Meaning of Obama’s Nobel Prize? Diplomacy Rehabilitated The saturation coverage of Obama’s big win has focussed overwhelmingly, and almost exclusively  on whether or not he deserves the prize based upon his performance in presidential office to date. That is a worthwhile debate, and  a formidable case can be made on either side of the issue. No, Obama has not yet managed to deliver ...
  • Daryl Copeland at USC Center on Public Diplomacy at the Annenberg School Listen to the Event (MP3)
  • Me, Noam and the Media In the last posting, I noted that the existence of a carefully considered, broadly-based, and widely-subscribed grand strategy could help countries situate themselves, and stay on a chosen international policy course, in constantly whirling world. The reality, however, is that most governments, and their policies, are blown around like the flotsam and jetsam on the pond ...
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy and Grand Strategy This fall I have begun to tour in support of the release of Guerrilla Diplomacy. Last week I addressed undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Toronto, and participated in a forum before a mixed group at Dalhousie University in Halifax. That institution’s Centre for Foreign Policy Studies has a special place in the ...
  • Science, Technology and Diplomacy In his typically excellent September 1 – 2 press and blog review of the burgeoning discourse on public diplomacy (PD), John Brown cites a quotation by Manuel Castells, author of the magisterial Information Age trilogy: Public Diplomacy is the…projection in the international arena of the values and ideas of the public… The aim of the ...
  • Science, Technology and International Policy – Part II Remember the 20th  century? At that time international relations revolved, variously, around geopolitical confrontation, ideological competition, territorial disputes, alliance politics, and multilateral  organizations. Today, clearly delineated empires are no longer colliding, the spectre of world war and mutually assured destruction has receded, and the centre of gravity in global relations has shifted. States are still with ...
  • Science, Technology and International Policy – Part I Underdevelopment and insecurity, much like globalization itself, are intimately connected to science and technology (S&T). A capacity to absorb and use  S&T can confer significant competitive advantage upon individuals, groups, cities, countries and regions , while the absence of that capacity can be costly. Together, science and technology present both a very complex challenge to, ...
  • Underdevelopment, Insecurity and Suicide Bombings The news last week of suicide bombings at hotels in Indonesia was unsettling. The knowledge that places you have stayed, or had a meal or a meeting in have become the targets of suicide bombers gives rise to a strange, uncomfortable sensation. The scenes of death and destruction at the Marriots in Jakarta and Islamabad, ...
  • Whither Development? Or, should that be withered development…? It was not that long ago that terms such as  “international development”,  “development cooperation”, “development assistance” and even “aid” were in heavy rotation in the discourse on international relations. This was true not only in places like the United Nations, but also in many capitals, great and small. Today development, like ...
  • DFAIT’s Guerilla Diplomat Bids Adieu Embassy Photo: Jeff Davis DFAIT’s Guerilla Diplomat Bids Adieu – Embassy – Diplomacy This Week (PDF)
  • Putting the Human back into Security – Part II A decade and more ago, the human security doctrine  was all the rage. Books, conferences, and even the foreign policy platforms of some governments were organized around it. Today, while some embers still glow, the fire is out. What happened? From the very beginning, some analysts, mainly, but not exclusively those subscribing to the realist school of international ...
  • Guerrilla Diplomacy – Ottawa Book Launch and Reception – Monday, June 29 Ottawa release of Daryl Copeland’s Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations Organized in association with Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Canadian Foreign Policy,  McGill-Queen’s University Press and Lynne Rienner Publishers. Please come to the book launch and reception on Monday June 29th, 6:00 – 7:30PM at: Nicholas Hoare Books 419 Sussex Drive Ottawa, On., Can K1N 9M6 RSVP – 613 562-2665 Contact ...
  • Putting the Human back into Security – Part I Security, not unlike globalization or development, is a very, very big idea. To talk about about it in any meaningful way, you need to know where to  begin, and what to focus on. In terms of security, might that be: National, or international? Common, or cooperative? Collective, or individual? State? Personal? Homeland? And what of any one of the welter of other, non-traditional security ...
  • Grappling with Globalization Working in a foreign ministry is as good a place as any, and better than most, to observe the world in transition.  I did it for 28 years. From that vantage point, it was near impossible to avoid thinking about why diplomacy has been performing so dismally, especially in recent years when diplomats have been ...
  • Rethinking World Order – Part III Why think about world order? Because diplomats, like everyone with a practical or intellectual interest in international political economy,  need an analytical tool suitable for understanding the big picture.  Today, the  marketplace for world order models is littered with paradigms and prototypes.  Some aren’t labelled as such. Many have next to no predictive or explanatory capacity. ...
  • Rethinking World Order – Part II Polarity is a static concept, and its expression is spatial. Various poles, be they considered of the hetero or multi-polar genus, can be named, mapped and fixed on a world atlas. In the dynamic, de-territorialized environment that characterizes the globalization age, each of these aspects is highly problematic. To construct a model of international relations that ...
  • Rethinking World Order – Part I It is Easter Monday in central Canada, and change is everywhere. You can smell it in the air and see it on the land. Seasons change. The way we see the world, and understand its workings, apparently does not. Modelling world order is a very high level analytical pursuit. It informs and conditions perception. During the long decades ...
  • Lashings of Insight – Part II One reason for the ISA’s enduring popularity is the sheer variety of presentations on offer. Anyone weary at the prospect of attending yet another panel on, say, constructivist critiques of neo-colonialism, or a reconsideration of the English School perspective on regional integration, can simply browse the telephone book-like ISA program and almost certainly find something ...
  • Lashings of Insight: Tid-bits from the Brain Food Buffet (I) Last month I spent five days at the 50th annual conference of the International Studies Association (ISA) in New York City. I make a point of participating in this sprawling brain food buffet most years, and although the intensity and pace of the program can be exhausting , with 40-50 simultaneous panels, five ...
  • Manoeuvring the Ship of State Most diplomats work in foreign ministries, and most foreign ministries have been struggling to adapt to the challenges posed by globalization. Those challenges, which include the emergence of rival international actors ranging from celebrities, to NGOs, to other government departments – are compounded during periods of weak leadership and uncertain political interest. At such times, ...
  • Diplomatic Surge? Part III – The dilemma of smart power The question of appropriate instrumentality raises an even more fundamental issue: does hard power plus soft power in fact equal smart power? In my view, and notwithstanding popular assumptions to the contrary, the answer is: not necessarily. The challenge associated with the promise of smart power strikes me, in fact, as crucial. While combining hard and soft power makes a certain ...
  • Diplomatic Surge? Part II – The things we carry I would attribute the running down of diplomacy in recent years to a trio of developments related to the carry-over from the Cold War of certain habits of mind, or intellectual baggage, which have been hoisted into the globalization age from the preceding era. In a nutshell, in the face of the complex threats and ...
  • Diplomatic Surge? Part I – From buzz to becoming These should be heady days for diplomats. After a long stretch languishing in relative obscurity, the willingness to explore diplomatic alternatives to the use of armed force in the pursuit of international policy objectives has become suddenly, well, fashionable. The arrival of the Obama administration, and especially Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vice President ...

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